Originally posted on National Post | Full Comment:

So many and unlikely are the twists in the discovery and identification of the remains of King Richard III, the last Plantagenet, dug up in a car park in Leicester, England, that one scarcely knows where to begin.

Let’s proceed chronologically.

Richard III was King of England for a period of 26 months (1483-1485). He died at the battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, the battle that essentially concluded the War of the Roses. Over the succeeding centuries, the location of Richard III’s burial place, and even the location of Bosworth Field, was lost in the mists of time.

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What kind of King was Richard III? Well, some contemporary accounts portray him quite favourably; for example, John Rous in his book, History of the English Kings, referred to the King’s “good heart” and progressive legislation, particularly in criminal law. But the Tudors, who succeeded Richard on the…

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